Dinosaurs Robotics Science 2.0 - Switched on kids

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Dinosaurs Robotics Science 2.0

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Dinosaurs Robotics Science 2.0

SKU: SOKBXDRS001

$24.95

or 4 fortnightly payments of $6.24 with Afterpay More info

Science 2.0 Dinosaur Robotics Construct your own 3D prehistoric dinosaur robot Connect the power and make it move Everything is included a motor pack a 3D T Rex body 7 support parts driving pins and instructions. It requires 2 AA batteries. Also available: Crocodile Robotics.

 

 

 

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Dinosaurs Robotics Science 2.0 : Science 2.0 Dinosaur Robotics Construct your own 3D prehistoric dinosaur robot Connect the power and make it move Everything is included a motor pack a 3D T Rex body 7 support parts driving pins and instructions. It requires 2 AA batteries. Also available: Crocodile Robotics.

Spark children’s interest fun, educational, and one-of-a-kind toy that teaches children everything about robotics, engineering, tech, and science! It’s a great gift for birthdays or any special occasion!

Children of all ages will love the Hunting Mode which allows the robot dino to search for items. Also check out Guard Mode which will protect a kid’s room and sends out an alerts if an intruder (like a little sister!) decides to come in.

Construct your own 3D prehistoric dinosaur robot! Connect the
power and make it move!! Everything is included: a motor pack, a
3D T Rex body, 7 support parts, driving pins and instructions.
It requires 2 AA batteries. Also available: Crocodile Robotics.

Dinosaurs Robotics Science 2.0 : About 225 million years ago, during the late Triassic period, these small dinosaurs were in the minority, whereas the bigger crocodile-like animals that lived alongside them were more numerous and diverse. Dinosaurs somehow went on to thrive while most other animals from that period became extinct.

Compared to their quadrupedal, heavy-built contemporaries, what stands out about these early dinosaurs is that they had an erect posture and could, at least intermittently, walk on two limbs. One theory is that their style of locomotion gave them a survival edge.

Accurate models are needed to replicate the motion of animals, which robotics researchers often take inspiration from. Mimicking a crocodile, for example, could be of interest to create a robot that can both swim and walk on land.

So far, research has shown that the long bones in the limbs of bigger animals are more robust than those of smaller animals. But this general trend has only been superficially observed.

 

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